All posts tagged Cork

  • 2.6 Being on and with

    Available through:

    Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/richscriven/citl6

    iTunes: itunes.apple.com/ie/podcast/littoral-space/id1454970013?mt=2

    Spotify: open.spotify.com/episode/2NeEQvpaFONvoZxIAentDN

    Stitcher: stitcher.com/podcast/littoral-space?refid=stpr

    2019-08-01 14.03.17-1-01This episode focuses on our connections with the river by experiencing it from on the surface or on the banks. Despite everything else going on around the city – the traffic, the rushing, the noises – the river itself passes, threading its own course. By being on or by the river we can feel affinities to it, a sense that links us with its calming presence.

    The opening and closing music is composed and played by Claire Layton; the field recordings are made and edited by Vicky Langan (www.vickylangan.com) and Richard Scriven, narration is provided by Ruth Harrington and Aisling White, and Joe Kiely gave production assistance. Cork is the Lee is co-created by geographer Dr Richard Scriven, with funding from Cork City Council’s Local Heritage Grant 2019. This podcast is shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License, which means you can remix, tweak, and build upon this work for non-commercial purposes, as long as you credit us and license your new creations under the same terms; save for the materials from Cork Folklore Project who retain the copyright of those sections.

    Littoral Space webpage: liminalentwinings.com/littoral-space-podcast/

    Twitter: twitter.com/LittoralSpace

    Instagram: www.instagram.com/littoralspaces/

    Dr Richard Scriven tweets at: twitter.com/RichardScrivGeo

  • 2.5 Nature and Wildlife

    2.5 Available through:
    Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/richscriven/citl5
    iTunes: itunes.apple.com/ie/podcast/littoral-space/id1454970013?mt=2
    Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/episode/61gUByrKQw78pB2mGiSZj8

    Stitcher: stitcher.com/podcast/littoral-space?refid=stpr

    The River Lee and its tributaries are a rich habitat for wildlife and biodiversity running across county Cork and through the city. This episode focuses on nature and wildlife along the river encourages us to (re)appreciate its natural heritage through discussions of otters, fishing, pollution, and birdlife.

    2019-04-22 12.03.58-1The opening and closing music is composed and played by Claire Layton; the field recordings are made and edited by Vicky Langan (www.vickylangan.com) and Richard Scriven, narration is provided by Ruth Harrington and Aisling White, and Joe Kiely gave production assistance. Cork is the Lee is co-created by geographer Dr Richard Scriven, with funding from Cork City Council’s Local Heritage Grant 2019.  This podcast is shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License, which means you can remix, tweak, and build upon this work for non-commercial purposes, as long as you credit us and license your new creations under the same terms; save for the materials from Cork Folklore Project who retain the copyright of those sections and the rendition of The Banks of My Own Lovely Lee. 

     

     

    Littoral Space webpage: liminalentwinings.com/littoral-space-podcast/
    Twitter: twitter.com/LittoralSpace
    Instagram: www.instagram.com/littoralspaces/

    Dr Richard Scriven tweets at: twitter.com/RichardScrivGeo

  • 2.4 Cultural Connections

    2.3 Available through:
    Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/richscriven/citl4
    iTunes: itunes.apple.com/ie/podcast/littoral-space/id1454970013?mt=2
    Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/episode/2fDeSjwqm1YMLkOlZaMGG1

    Stitcher: stitcher.com/podcast/littoral-space?refid=stpr

    This episode focuses on the Lee is a cultural force in the life of Cork. It uses historical accounts, art works, and poetry to emphasise the importance of valuing the river. The installment also highlights potential threats to our personal and communal attachment to the river and the need to ensure we foster and encourage appreciations and sustainable uses of the Lee.

    View of Cork from Audley Place c.1750 by John Butts from the Crawford Art Gallery collection (Cat. No. 299-P)  https://www.crawfordartgallery.ie/pages/paintings/JohnButts.html

    View of Cork from Audley Place c.1750 by John Butts from the Crawford Art Gallery collection (Cat. No. 299-P) https://www.crawfordartgallery.ie/pages/paintings/JohnButts.html

    Excerpts from The Banks Of My Own Lovely Lee by Dick Forbes and J.C. Flanahan are sung by Seán O’Sé. The opening and closing music is composed and played by Claire Layton; the field recordings are made and edited by Vicky Langan (www.vickylangan.com) and Richard Scriven, narration is provided by Ruth Harrington and Aisling White, and Joe Kiely gave production assistance. Cork is the Lee is co-created by geographer Dr Richard Scriven, with funding from Cork City Council’s Local Heritage Grant 2019.  This podcast is shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License, which means you can remix, tweak, and build upon this work for non-commercial purposes, as long as you credit us and license your new creations under the same terms; save for the materials from Cork Folklore Project who retain the copyright of those sections and the rendition of The Banks of My Own Lovely Lee. 

     

     

    Littoral Space webpage: liminalentwinings.com/littoral-space-podcast/
    Twitter: twitter.com/LittoralSpace
    Instagram: www.instagram.com/littoralspaces/

    Dr Richard Scriven tweets at: twitter.com/RichardScrivGeo

  • 2.3 Crossings: Bridges & Tunnel

    2.3 Available through:
    Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/richscriven/citl3
    iTunes: itunes.apple.com/ie/podcast/littoral-space/id1454970013?mt=2
    Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/episode/5vYYc1AOHUj2hFg7sRd3JH

    Stitcher: stitcher.com/podcast/littoral-space?refid=stpr

    This episode looks at the crossings of the Lee with a focus on the bridges found in the city. The city’s expansion from its medieval core from the late 16th century involved initial building of bridges between the marshy islands before culverting over most of the channels. Then, as the urban are grew, crossings were required along the banks linking the central island with the south and north sides. As well as providing an overview of the topic, specific reference is made to South Gate Bridge, St Patrick’s Bridge, the Shaky Bridge, Brian Boru and Clontarf Bridges, and the Jack Lynch Tunnel.

    2019-07-31 19.54.27-01

    The opening and closing music is composed and played by Claire Layton; the field recordings are made and edited by Vicky Langan (www.vickylangan.com) and Richard Scriven, narration is provided by Ruth Harrington and Aisling White, and Joe Kiely gave production assistance. Cork is the Lee is co-created by geographer Dr Richard Scriven, with funding from Cork City Council’s Local Heritage Grant 2019.  This podcast is shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License, which means you can remix, tweak, and build upon this work for non-commercial purposes, as long as you credit us and license your new creations under the same terms; save for the materials from Cork Folklore Project who retain the copyright of those sections. 

     

     

    Littoral Space webpage: liminalentwinings.com/littoral-space-podcast/
    Twitter: twitter.com/LittoralSpace
    Instagram: www.instagram.com/littoralspaces/

    Dr Richard Scriven tweets at: twitter.com/RichardScrivGeo

  • 2.2 Source to City

    2.2 Available through:
    Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/richscriven/cork-is-the-lee-2
    iTunes: itunes.apple.com/ie/podcast/littoral-space/id1454970013?mt=2
    Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/episode/2hOwYrurGOYGd7lc7DMVMR

    Stitcher: stitcher.com/podcast/littoral-space?refid=stpr

    Tracing the flow of the River Lee from its source in Gougane Barra to the outskirts of the city is the focus of this second episode. Interviews with local residents and business owners, as well as people who are passionate about the river are combined to explore the upper river, considering the different spaces and stretches found along the way, including Lough Allua, Inchigeela, the Gearagh, the flooding for the Iniscarra Reservoir, and the Lee fields.

    2019-08-08 16.25.29The opening and closing music is composed and played by Claire Layton; the field recordings are made and edited by Vicky Langan (www.vickylangan.com) and Richard Scriven, narration is provided by Ruth Harrington and Aisling White, and Joe Kiely gave production assistance. Cork is the Lee is co-created by geographer Dr Richard Scriven, with funding from Cork City Council’s Local Heritage Grant 2019.  This podcast is shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License, which means you can remix, tweak, and build upon this work for non-commercial purposes, as long as you credit us and license your new creations under the same terms.

     

     

    Littoral Space webpage: liminalentwinings.com/littoral-space-podcast/
    Twitter: twitter.com/LittoralSpace
    Instagram: www.instagram.com/littoralspaces/

    Dr Richard Scriven tweets at: twitter.com/RichardScrivGeo

  • 2.1 Reflections on sound and the river

    2.1 Available through:
    Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/richscriven/cork-is-the-lee-1
    iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/ie/podcast/littoral-space/id1454970013?mt=2
    Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/episode/6Q7XMuKtNh3ryZKnbGNxyA

    Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/littoral-space?refid=stpr

    In this first episode of Cork is the Lee, Dr Richard Scriven presents a different character to the following installments with a blend of field recordings and short reflections thinking about sound or encounters with the Lee, all structured around five river features. The field recordings are made and edited by Vicky Langan (www.vickylangan.com), the opening and closing music is composed and played by Claire Layton, and title narration is by Ruth Harrington.

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    Littoral Space webpage: liminalentwinings.com/littoral-space-podcast/
    Twitter: twitter.com/LittoralSpace
    Instagram: www.instagram.com/littoralspaces/

    Dr Richard Scriven tweets at: twitter.com/RichardScrivGeo

  • Cork is the Lee: an audio exploration of the River Lee

    2019-04-22 12.03.58-1

    This auditory project explores the cultural and natural heritage role of the river Lee in the life of Cork city through a podcast series and a workshop during Heritage Week 2019. Using the unique capacity of sound to convey meaning and evoke emotions, this project will interview people who use and appreciate the Lee (eg. rowers, fishers, naturalists), utilise historical sources, and take field-recordings along its length, which will be combined to create a rich and unique insight into river as geographical and cultural force. The project has received funding under Cork City Council’s Local Community Heritage Grant 2019 and is supported by the Department of Geography, UCC.

    You can contact Richard by email – corkisthelee@gmail.com – or on Facebook: facebook.com/corkisthelee

    Podcast

    Cork is the Lee series benefits from the popularity and accessibility of the medium and its capacity to reach larger audiences. It will be disseminated through my podcast, Littoral Space.

    Heritage Week workshop, Tuesday 20th Aug, Geography Department, UCC

    Participants will listen to a series of recordings that display distinct aspects of the river by combining the soundscape with people’s stories. This audio journey will take place in a slightly darkened space enabling attuning to rhythms and flows of the Lee.

  • Creative Ireland Project

    (Re)sounding holy wells is an artistic and cultural heritage project being led by Vicky Langan, independent artist, and Dr Richard Scriven, Department of Geography, UCC, to imaginatively explore holy wells in Cork through workshops, audio recordings, and oral histories. It is being funded by the Creative Ireland County Cork Grant Scheme under the community participation strand of the Creative Ireland Programme 2017-2022. Using a collaborative approach with both primary schools and community heritage groups, the project will examine and highlight the roles of holy wells as cultural amenities and sites of vernacular heritage. Fresh understandings of the wells will be produced through the use of audio by combining field recordings with accounts of the holy wells from young people and community members. Participative workshops and performances will be advertised in local media and online; also, all materials will be available on a forthcoming website.

    Vicky Langan is a Cork-based artist whose practice operates across several overlapping fields, chiefly performance, sound, and film. She has gained bursary awards from Cork City Council and the Arts Council of Ireland. She has also been awarded a residency at the Centre Culturel Irlandais, Paris.

    Dr Scriven is an Irish Research Council Government of Ireland Postdoctoral Fellow and a Royal Irish Academy Charlemont Scholar in the Department of Geography, UCC.

    CI_Mark_Right_Gold Cork County Council logo.jpg

  • Lady’s Well, Cork: Renovations

    I had previously commented on the deteriorating state of Lady’s Well in Cork city. Thanks to works by Cork City Council* the site has been cleaned up and new structures have been put in place around the well. The necessity for grids over the well may be seen as unfortunate, but will not impinge on the well excessively as does not seem to be used for religious-spiritual reasons. These additions will ensure the preservation of the site and perhaps a revival of devotional activity in the future?

    DSC_0847 DSC_0854

     

    *I had raised the matter with one of my local representatives, Kiernan McCarthy (corkheritage.ie), who has done significant work in promoting Cork’s heritage.